Recycled Yarn Love + KAL Cast-on

Today we are kicking off the Berroco Remix® Light KAL (that’s Knit Along). Several members of the design team are knitting Derecho from the Remix Light pattern collection, but we love Remix Light so much that we want everyone to try it. So you’re welcome to join the KAL using Remix Light and any pattern of your choice. Find more information on the knit-along and join in the fun in our Ravelry group.

One of the reasons we love Remix Light is because it’s one of our three recycled fiber yarns. Berroco’s recycled yarns come from a very special mill in France, where they have a patent on their unique process for giving new life to discarded ready-to-wear clothing. These recycled yarns are made from high-quality, excess clothing collected in Europe. The zippers and buttons get removed and then the fabrics are sorted by fiber content and by colors. As much as possible, the original colors of the fabrics is used, which saves water and prevents pollution.

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Ponente knit in Remix Light

For Berroco Indigo®, the mill uses only 100% cotton and denim. You’ll notice that the yarn composition is 95% cotton and 5% other fibers. The other fibers mentioned are the threads used for the seams and details of the denim being recycled.

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Bena knit in Berroco Indigo

 

Once sorted and cleaned, the process for Remix, Remix Light, and Indigo is the same. The fabrics are garneted, which is the technical word for very carefully shredding with finely bristled combs to return the fabric to fiber. The resulting fluff (not the technical term) is combed onto roving and spun into yarn. This new yarn has all the softness of a favorite sweatshirt or a pair of perfectly broken in jeans with the benefit of being easy care, machine washable yarns.

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Astilbe knit in Berroco Remix

Our recycled yarns are hard wearing yarns that will stand up to the test of time. They are animal-fiber free and so good for those with wool sensitivities. Use them for knitted or crocheted garments for the whole family and for the home.

 

2 Comments

    1. Hi Eileen,

      If you click the name “Astilbe” under the photo, it will take you to the page for Astilbe.

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