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Posts tagged ‘yarn’

Amy’s Thread: Knitter Fidelity

Are you loyal to your knitting projects? Do you work on one project at a time or do you shop around…different projects for different moods? Read more

Get to Know Berroco: Berroco Remix

There are a lot of things that make Berroco Remix a special yarn. Even before I knit my Adeline in it, I was intrigued by its rustic look and the way it felt – soft but full of texture. How does Remix get such a unique look and feel? It’s actually an interesting story…

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Emily Explains: What if I have to unravel my knitting again… Is this okay?

I learned how to knit during my first year at college. I took a machine knitting class where I made my very first knitted garment (a pink dress covered in pink florals)! At the end of the class, I immediately begged my friends to teach me everything they knew about handknitting. Read more

Get to Know Berroco: Shipping

As many of you know, we switched manufacturers last year, which caused a delay with some of our Berroco Comfort yarns. It was tough because – as much as we knew we wanted to take the time to make sure our new Comfort yarn was as good or better than our old Comfort yarn – we HATE backorders! I’m sure you can relate.

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Ask Amanda: What’s a dye lot?

Back when I was still a new knitter, I came across a gorgeous hank of alpaca in a really pretty color. I knew it would make a beautiful sweater, but there was only one hank of the color I liked on the yarn shop’s shelf. When I took it up to the counter to ask if there were any more hanks hiding somewhere in storage, it turned out to be the last one. Luckily, the shop owner offered to order another bag of that color for me. I happily placed the order, but I couldn’t wait to start knitting with that yarn, so I decided to buy the single hank and start swatching right away. Of course, the shop owner pointed out that the dye lot of the new yarn probably wouldn’t match the dye lot of the single hank, but I didn’t think much of it.

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One more!

Hi again, just a quick addendum to the Vest-uary post. I completely spaced out on a very cute vest pattern! It’s the Ribby-Yo Vest by Cathy Carron. Knit in Peruvia Quick, it’s available now in the Spring 2009 issue of Knitscene, one of my favorite knitting publications…

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This vest was featured in a very cool column called Style Spotting. Styling knitwear can be difficult–you don’t want to have that unfortunate slip shod, ramshackle look that pop culture usually saddles us crafters with. We know we’re better than that!! This column helps by discussing the sartorial properties of specific garments and showing a few cute underpinnings and accessories. To quote my fellow UMass alumni the Pixies, it’s educational! I don’t know about you but I’d like a whole issue’s worth of this sort of content…here is a preview: 

 

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Cute! With such a chunky yarn, you’d have plenty of time to whip this up before the end of February/Vest-uary, especially if you have President’s Day off…

CR

Feel it out…

In the last post,  Norah described Pure Merino Heathers as having a “slightly dry hand,” and blog reader Marty asked us to elaborate on this. 

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“Hand” is an elusive, idiosyncratic when it comes to yarn. I like to borrow a few terms from the culinary world to explain what hand means–it is similar to the multi-sensory descriptors of “mouthfeel” and Japanese concept “umami”. The only way to develop your conception of hand is to head to your local yarn shop and revert to a childlike state!

A yarn might feel squeaky, crunchy, fluffy or slick. Knitting with it might be a pleasure or a trial–it all has to do with the combination of fibers, the twist and the amount of processing it has gone through from sheep to shelf. I’ve noticed that the combination of a high twist, super-smooth alpaca and bouncy wool in Cuzco make my knitting go REALLY quickly. For me it has a sponge-like hand.

When Norah says ‘dry’ I immediately think of an unmercerized cotton or a starchy linen, maybe something like Love It or Linen Jeans. Words used to describe these yarns are ‘cool, matte, well-worn tee, stonewashed jeans’. A yarn with a dry hand is great to knit with in the summer and will create crisp, comfortable garments that aren’t overly soft or fuzzy–like Norah said, perfect for menswear and really anyone who wants a no-fuss casual garment. 

Thinking about Pure Merino Heather has just made me SUPER WISTFUL for my dream wardrobe that I’ll never have time to knit, Urban Layers from NG v1 …SIGH…one day I will knit a Kaari and never take it off! 

 

 

 

CR 

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